CHOPIN IN WINTER STUART DYBEK PDF

Throughout Coast of Chicago Dybek uses specific elements music to create the mood of the city. Music plays an important role in Chopin in Winter and Blight but it is intertwined in some of the other short stories to presever an overall mood of the city. In Dybek's short story Blight , music represents the coming of age of a group of neighborhood friends. These friends had formed an unsuccesful band and now that they have driver's licenses their focus is elsewhere. One night the car's transmission fell out and the car became pure junk leading them to push it over a bridge. But except for the bubbles on the surface, it was gone.

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How is that possible? I must be reading the wrong stuff. Like many Dybek stories, various characters and ideas move through the story passing each other in invisible hallways made of metaphor and symbolism. Or something like that.

He is always making connections or suggestions that the reader makes connections. The music traveled down as clearly as Marcy said my crying had traveled up.

When I closed my eyes I could imagine sitting on the Oriental carpet beside her huge piano. What do you think about this story? You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Google account. You are commenting using your Twitter account. You are commenting using your Facebook account. Notify me of new comments via email. Notify me of new posts via email. Share this: Twitter Facebook. Like this: Like Loading Leave a Reply Cancel reply Enter your comment here Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:.

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The Coast of Chicago

How is that possible? I must be reading the wrong stuff. Like many Dybek stories, various characters and ideas move through the story passing each other in invisible hallways made of metaphor and symbolism. Or something like that.

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Interview with Stuart Dybek

The narrator of one of Stuart Dybek's elegiac new stories goes to the Art Institute of Chicago and stands before Edward Hopper's ''Nighthawks,'' that famous painting of a corner diner, done in somber tones of black and blue and brown. He stands there, closes his eyes, and thinks to himself: ''It was night in Hopper's painting; the diner illuminated the dark city corner with a stark light it didn't seem capable of throwing on its own. Three customers sat at the counter as if waiting, not for something to begin, but rather to end, and I knew how effortless it would be to open my eyes and find myself waiting there, too. Hopper's painting captures perfectly the mood of Mr. Dybek's stories - the solitary lives of his characters, the lyrical desolation of their city neighborhood, the feeling of longing and regret that encircles their hopes and dreams. As in Sherwood Anderson's ''Winesburg, Ohio,'' most of the stories take place at night or twilight, that hour when the cheerful routines of day give way to more subterranean emotions, when the mundane facts of life take on a hallucinatory magic.

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‘Chopin In Winter’ by Stuart Dybek

MacArthur Foundation. Acclaimed American writer Stuart Dybek is an exception among writers of modern fiction: he has built his reputation largely on the strength of his short stories. They linger on the past. They feed on dreams. Most of his stories are set in the Pilsen and Little Village neighbourhoods of Chicago, where the writer grew up among immigrants from eastern Europe and Mexico. The action takes place in apartment buildings, stairways, alleys, taverns, and by the railroad tracks.

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