DIARY NOBODY GEORGE WEEDON GROSSMITH PDF

Arrowsmith , Printer , Quay Street. Why should I not publish my diary? My only regret is that I did not commence it when I was a youth. We settle down in our new home, and I resolve to keep a diary.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

Return to Book Page. The Diary of a Nobody by George Grossmith ,. Weedon Grossmith. Weedon Grossmith's book presents the details of English suburban life through the anxious and accident-prone character of Charles Pooter.

Pooter's diary chronicles his daily routine, which includes small parties, minor embarrassments, home improvements, and his relationship with a troublesome son. The small minded but essentially decent suburban world he inhabits is b Weedon Grossmith's book presents the details of English suburban life through the anxious and accident-prone character of Charles Pooter. The small minded but essentially decent suburban world he inhabits is both hilarious and painfully familiar. This edition features Weedon Grossmith's illustrations and an introduction which discusses the story's social context.

Get A Copy. Paperback , Oxford World's Classics , pages. Published October 15th by Oxford University Press first published More Details Original Title. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about The Diary of a Nobody , please sign up. It's too long I can't read it? Barbara-Ann Brown It's not long enough for me, it ended far too soon When first published? Ryan as a serial series in a magazine. See all 4 questions about The Diary of a Nobody…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order.

Start your review of The Diary of a Nobody. Aug 07, Lisa rated it liked it Shelves: books-to-read-before-you-die , nice-try-but-no-cigars.

Well, what can I say? Bloggers, Facebookers - who would have thought you had a predecessor in Victorian England? Who would have thought the vain thoughts and actions of a completely unimportant person with big ideas about his own personality were meticulously documented and published back then already, including lists of food, what to wear on what occasion, social encounters, small run-ins with friends and family, hopelessly disappointing egocentric grown-up children?

If he had had a smartphone, Well, what can I say? If he had had a smartphone, the dear Mr Nobody would have posted a picture of his dinner on his blog each night. As it is, he simply writes down the minute by minute of his event-less life.

He is so proud of his puns that he repeats them to himself and laughs out loud. If he had a blog, he would count the likes and share "the joke of the day" with all his acquaintances.

An unspectacular read, which leaves two reflections. First of all, humans have always had the need to be "seen" and "heard" by others, to distinguish themselves from the crowd and to stick out. That is not new, and our technology simply makes it easier to reach outside our own community. My second thought was that the novel obviously is sarcastic, making fun of this need. It seems to me that it is harder to laugh at it nowadays, as we all indulge in the illusion of visibility to different degrees today.

Who can still laugh at it silently? Without repeating the joke on Goodreads, counting the likes? Not me. For here I am, writing another review to be posted and shared. As much as I shun other social media, Goodreads satisfies that wish to share in my world, and I would be beyond hypocritical if I made fun of the human need of the boring, boasting Everyman in the diary.

He might be a Nobody, but he surely pointed towards the future in a more realistic way than many other Victorian heroes.

Not sure if I recommend the novel, as it is rather boring, like reading online what a friend had for breakfast, with an accompanying picture, but on the other hand, we like that kind of sharing, don't we? View all 57 comments. May 31, Ahmad Sharabiani rated it really liked it Shelves: humor , book , memories , 19th-century , literature , classics.

It originated as an intermittent serial in Punch magazine in —89 and first appeared in book form, with extended text and added illustrations, in The Diary records the daily events in the lives of a London clerk, Charles Pooter, his wife Carrie, his son Lupin, and numerous friends and acquaintances over a The Diary records the daily events in the lives of a London clerk, Charles Pooter, his wife Carrie, his son Lupin, and numerous friends and acquaintances over a period of 15 months.

Interrupted by a loving thump at the door. I studied my year-old self carefully then looked at my year-old self and noted nothing had changed facially in two years except I was even more handsomely bespectacled.

After all, I wrote it. Mark Nicholls from circled the Mark Nicholls from like a toreador taunting a pacifist bull. Speedy Gonzalez. I snickered, neglecting to tell him about our vagina transplant. Lydia Lunch appears on my desk and berates me for being a pussywhipped pastyasted whitebred chickenshed motherloving dolescrouging booksucking bitchboy.

She laughs and we have anal and a slice of malt loaf. The question will arise, however, as to whether the first sentence needed a tense change, seeing it was written yesterday. The doorbell will ring.

Is he in? I realised that would probably be a mistake. He tries to attract attention by pirouetting on the coffee table, but at his age the best he can manage is a forward roll on the settee.

View all 34 comments. The diary of my everyday life would be very boring, and by most measure so is Charles Pooter's. Living in late Victorian Era England, Pooter and his wife Carrie are stuck deep into middle class society.

But Pooter knows his place, and he seems quite happy to make the best of it. He pays homage to his employer, appreciates his modest home, and is satisfied with his occasional chance to rub shoulders with the upper class at the Lord Mayors Ball. He daily frets over things like shirt collars, boot The diary of my everyday life would be very boring, and by most measure so is Charles Pooter's.

He daily frets over things like shirt collars, boot black, his housekeepers shortcomings, and so on. But his life, and the diary's, is helped along by his two neighbors and friends, Gowing and Cummings, who are always popping in, always going and coming, and if you get that little joke, then you will get the essence of this story and the essence of Charles Pooter.

I enjoyed the deadpan humor, and my enjoyment was enhanced by the splendid narration of the book by Martin Clifton. View 1 comment. Aug 06, Jan-Maat added it Recommends it for: the light hearted. Shelves: 19th-century , british-isles , novel , humour. This reminded me of Three Men in a Boat in that I don't feel that some great moments add up to a great book. A diary format allowed the Grossmiths to have a series of comic view spoiler [ I use the term lightly - comic at least in their opinion, the reader will make up their own mind hide spoiler ] incidents without the inconvenience of a plot, although there are some long running story lines that are tied up by the end of the book.

The diary is written by Mr Pooter, a senior bank clerk who wo This reminded me of Three Men in a Boat in that I don't feel that some great moments add up to a great book.

The diary is written by Mr Pooter, a senior bank clerk who works in the City of London view spoiler [ now that's a Britishism For none UKers the City of London is a separate legal entity located in central London where various financial institutions have their headquarters hide spoiler ] and records the trials and tribulations of his late Victorian life after moving into a new home.

The idea is that you find his self-importance and occasional pomposities amusing, and it helps to be socially superior to characters of this sort for the book to work. In the humour of an in-egalitarian society, jokes turn on the snobbishness and angst of middle-class Victorian life, for example Pooter is extremely satisfied to be invited to a fancy event and extremely dissatisfied when he finds one of his neighbours - who in his eyes is only a tradesman - is also there.

I'm of too low a social class to be as thoroughly amused as the target audience view spoiler [ or perhaps my funny bone simply has a different angle, you've got to be open minded about these things hide spoiler ] , for instance I found Pooter's pride and satisfaction in the idea of having his son work in the bank alongside him, the two of them taking the omnibus into the city together, tender rather than comic.

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The Diary of a Nobody

The great British novel about class snobbery and overweening pomposity, The Diary of a Nobody gifts the world Mr Pooter, a Victorian gentleman constantly at war with tradesmen, his feckless son and a barrage of inanimate objects. Channelling a razor-sharp satire through the everyday mishaps of the immortal comic character Mr Pooter, George and Weedon Grossmith's The Diary of a Nobody is edited with an introduction and notes by Ed Glinert in Penguin Classics. Mr Pooter is a man of modest ambitions, content with his ordinary life. Yet he always seems to be troubled by disagreeable tradesmen, impertinent young office clerks and wayward friends, not to mention his devil-may-care son Lupin with his unsuitable choice of bride.

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Arrowsmith, Bristol. This fictitious diary details fifteen months in the life of Mr. Charles Pooter, a middle aged city clerk of lower middle-class status but significant social aspirations, living in the fictional 'Brickfield Terrace' in London. The diary was written by George Grossmith and his brother Weedon Grossmith who also contributed the illustrations. It first appeared in Punch magazine through the years — 89, and was first printed in book form in Due to much of the humour deriving from Mr. Pooter's comical tendency toward self-importance, the book has spawned the word "Pooterish" to describe the taking of oneself excessively seriously.

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