GAMESMANSHIP STEPHEN POTTER PDF

This was on my dad's bookshelf when I was a kid, but I didn't discover it until late in high school. If Monty Python were to trace the roots of their art, they end up here. Potter is a brilliant, dry wit, and understatedly so. This is the only book I know where the text reads itself in a British accent.

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This was on my dad's bookshelf when I was a kid, but I didn't discover it until late in high school. If Monty Python were to trace the roots of their art, they end up here. Potter is a brilliant, dry wit, and understatedly so. This is the only book I know where the text reads itself in a British accent.

Potter teaches the sometimes-subtle art of "one-upmanship", expanding on a philosophy dedicated to winning in sport and applying it to life at large. In one thousand years, Potter's The Theory and. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem?

Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Frank Wilson Illustrator. For any gameplayer, here's a book that focuses on the subject of gamesmanship as a civilized art as old as the competitive spirit in man. Stephen Potter points out "the true Gamesman is always the Good Sportman". Get A Copy. Paperback , 80 pages.

Published January 1st by Moyer Bell first published More Details Original Title. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Dec 19, Manny rated it really liked it Shelves: well-i-think-its-funny , games. An idea that I'm surprised hasn't been imitated more: a satire masquerading as a self-help manual. While pretending to instruct you in the various tricks you can use to make your opponents feel uncomfortable, Potter takes generally quite successful pot-shots at all sorts of targets.

The most obvious one is, of course, the ridiculous lengths people will go to in order to win games, but there are few aspects of British society that escape unscathed.

He's completely deadpan throughout; in fact, whe An idea that I'm surprised hasn't been imitated more: a satire masquerading as a self-help manual. He's completely deadpan throughout; in fact, when I first came across this book at age 10 or so, I didn't realize it was a satire. My favourite section, you will not be surprised to hear, is the one on chess.

Potter sensibly points out that there is no way a person unversed in chess theory will be able to beat a chess expert. Instead, he recommends the Potter Gambit: you play any three moves and then resign, after which you use some version of the following script.

Well, I must resign of course. When you exchange, I could perhaps recapture with the bishop Your queen comes in and it's all over. Interesting position. View all 5 comments. Jul 21, notgettingenough rated it really liked it Shelves: modern-lit , humour , games.

There is something melancholic reading about a world that no longer exists but that was real to you. To think that when this was written everybody played games all the time. If this were written now nobody would read it and I guess the fact that such a big seller in its day has all of 88 ratings on goodreads just goes to show the likely truth of that. What might Dav There is something melancholic reading about a world that no longer exists but that was real to you. What might Davis have learned in advance of that contest?

View all 7 comments. In one thousand years, Potter's The Theory and This was on my dad's bookshelf when I was a kid, but I didn't discover it until late in high school. View 1 comment. This is a very tongue in cheek book about gamesmanship.

Or how to win without actually cheating. It was written in the late 40s and it's pretty absurd in a proto-Monty Python way. It does however have some serious points to make about getting the upper hand without being obvious.

Many of the examples are clever but there's always a germ of truth in them. Despite the content, I just couldn't give it more than three stars. Glad I read it though. Jul 07, Chris rated it liked it. Potter gives an introduction to winning games despite lesser skill without being unsporting. This is done either by winning the mental game, such as by putting the opponent on edge or dissecting their form.

If that fails, one can fall back to trying to win the gamesgame winning despite losing, by convincing the opponent that you are the superior player but lost for a fluke, or by winning the favor of the spectators, etc. Potter gives the example of how he has never won a chess match, but is co Potter gives an introduction to winning games despite lesser skill without being unsporting.

Potter gives the example of how he has never won a chess match, but is considered to be an excellent player by his friends. He does this by, for example, resigning a few moves into the game saying "well, I suppose I have no choice to resign. You'll take my queen in 16 moves Unless you sacrifice your bishop Good game.

I read it because it's old and offbeat. It's a very quick read with lots of nice illustrations. Not extraordinary but good. If the title and subject matter grabs you, and if you can get a free copy, I'd suggest you read it. Otherwise you're not missing out if you skip it. Almost as funny as it used to be. It was a huge bestseller in and it still sells today. In a way I think it fits in with English middle-class feelings of insecurity after the Second World War, with the welfare state and trade-union power building up around them.

Ignore it all and play croquet as slily as possible. Funny and quick read! Aug 06, sardit rated it liked it Shelves: europe , self-help , non-fiction , humor. Not as delightful as it was when I was 10, but what is? Still, as a satirical guide for combining immaculate politeness, Machiavelli, and applying them to fundamentally trivial matters, it excels. Aug 27, Johan Keppens rated it really liked it. Klein maar fijn! Boekje barst van de ironie, is fictieve non-fictie. Despite being 70 years old, it could have been written this morning.

Feb 08, Anthony Buckley rated it liked it Shelves: literature. Stephen Potter was all the rage in the late s, and there was a film based on his books starring Terry Thomas. Leslie Philips and co. They are all about how to manipulate people and put them down. I thought the book a bit too small-minded, sadistic and sour for my taste.

Machiavelli rewritten for the golf club. Indeed, the makers of the film seem to have shared my opinion, coming off the manipulation at the end in favour of such values as generosity, honesty etc, just so the film could have a Stephen Potter was all the rage in the late s, and there was a film based on his books starring Terry Thomas.

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Stephen Potter

The wisdom of Stephen Potter is my greatest secret. And now it is my gift to you. After years of awkward, social fumbling at school, followed by years of failing in my first experiences in the workplace, I knew I needed help. I just never thought it would come from tiny books that were written in the early s.

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INTRODUCTORY

Stephen Meredith Potter 1 February — 2 December was a British author best known for his parodies of self-help books, and their film and television derivatives. After leaving school in the last months of the First World War he was commissioned as a junior officer in the British Army , but by the time he had completed his training the war was over and he was demobilised. He then studied English at Oxford , and after some false starts he spent his early working life as an academic, lecturing in English literature at Birkbeck College , part of the University of London , during which time he published several works on Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Finding his income inadequate to support himself and his family, he left the university and took up a post producing and writing for the BBC. He remained with the BBC until after the Second World War , when he became a freelance writer, and remained so for the rest of his life.

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Gamesmanship and the strange little books that taught me how to win at everything

Since the dawn of the first tee-time, golfers have been rattling opponents with silly chatter and oafish manners, or by invoking irrelevant rules or otherwise crossing the bounds of decency to induce anxiety. But it wasn't until shortly after the end of World War II, when an intellectual British writer and golf nut, newly unemployed, took pen in hand and wrote an exquisite little book of sports humor bearing as its title the term he had coined, "Gamesmanship," that the world had at last a name for the odious ploys, stunts, and tactics practically every golfer uses at one point or another. It's been 55 years since Stephen Potter devised that word and codified nearly all the bad behaviors we associate with it: "The Theory and Practice of Gamesmanship: Or, The Art of Winning Games Without Actually Cheating" achieved overnight popularity when it was published in Today, the man who came to see his concept placed securely in the lexicon of sportswriters, broadcasters, athletes, and fans is now practically forgotten. But Potter achieved cult status throughout the late s and 50s with a succession of slender books of humor, mostly of a "-manship" variety -- One-Upmanship, Lifemanship, Supermanship -- also mostly brilliant, mostly funny, and mostly successful. Stephen Potter's obsession with games in general, and the infinite ways that subtle comments and gestures could tip the scales of competition, anticipated the invasion of sports psychology by 40 years.

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