KUKATHAS LIBERAL ARCHIPELAGO PDF

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Would you like to tell us about a lower price? If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support? In his major new work Chandran Kukathas offers, for the first time, a book-length treatment of this controversial and influential theory of minority rights.

The work is a defence of a form of liberalism and multiculturalism. The general question it tries to answer is: what is the principled basis of a free society marked by cultural diversity and group loyalties? More particularly, it explains whether such a society requires political institutions which recognize minorities; how far it should tolerate such minorities when their ways differ from those of the mainstream community; to what extent political institutions should address injustices suffered by minorities at the hands of the wider society, and also at the hands of the powerful within their own communities; what role, if any, the state should play in the shaping of a society's national identity; and what fundamental values should guide our reflections on these matters.

Its main contention is that a free society is an open society whose fundamental principle is the principle of freedom of association. A society is free to the extent that it is prepared to tolerate in its midst associations which differ or dissent from its standards or practices. An implication of these principles is that political society is also no more than one among other associations; its basis is the willingness of its members to continue to associate under the terms which define it.

While it is an 'association of associations', it is not the only such association; it does not subsume all other associations. The principles of a free society describe not a hierarchy of superior and subordinate authorities but an archipelago of competing and overlapping jurisdictions. The idea of a liberal archipelago is defended as one which supplies us with a better metaphor of the free society than do older notions such as the body politic, or the ship of state.

This work presents a challenge, and an alternative, to other contemporary liberal theories of multiculturalism. Read more Read less. Customers who viewed this item also viewed. Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1. Previous page. Rationalism, Pluralism, and Freedom. Anarchy, State, and Utopia. Next page. Customers who bought this item also bought.

Review Review from previous edition Chandran Kukathas is a professor of political theory. He completed his D. Phil at Oxford University in No customer reviews. How does Amazon calculate star ratings? The machine learned model takes into account factors including: the age of a review, helpfulness votes by customers and whether the reviews are from verified purchases. Review this product Share your thoughts with other customers.

Write a customer review. Most helpful customer reviews on Amazon. Verified Purchase. This book advances the thesis that the most fundamental freedom is not that of speech or movement or even bodily integrity, but that of association. Sounds ludicrous at first stating, but the exposition is so carefully reasoned and the arguments of detractors are so thoughtfully presented that one cannot help being persuaded.

Finally, as the concepts began to permeate my awareness, I realized how thoroughly this book probes and examines the nature of what it is to be a human: that is to say, a social animal as well as a conscious mind. I had to read the book slowly, taking day-long breaks at points for the ideas to percolate. This is a brilliant book, and one that may be looked back on as a foundational classic of political philosophy one day.

This is a systematic and interesting take on the foundations of a liberal or should I say, libertarian society. The author places freedom of association first before any other freedoms of the individual per se: the freedom to join and importantly! By doing this he attempts to escape the search for universal common denominators as a basis for society, which must either be trivially poor, or leave important elements of society out because they do not share these beliefs.

Kukathas is unconvinced that truly universal values for establishing a foundation for any society, can be found. So instead of a universal set of rights and obligations, he proposes that people be free to associate and dissociate into any religious, moral etc. You could call it "constitutional pluralism", in a way. He opposes special rights for special groups, which follows logically from the idea that since people should be free to choose the group they want, they can not then argue after the fact that any specific croup should have privileges that other groups don't have.

This argument is relevant in discussion of say, aborigine rights whenever they differ from the rights of other groups within a country. The analysis and oblique approach to liberty proposed here is intriguing. I do have some issues with readability of the text sometimes, the cat is out of the bag pretty soon and the belabored exposition that follows, of reasons, conditions, and bylaws, is a bit tedious at times.

Also, the book could have benefited from some more empirical or scenario analysis - to ask not just, why is this desirable, but also, can this work? But all in all, very worthwhile ideas here, to those who despair between nationalism, special rights groups, and global soup value systems that take a piece from everywhere but work for no one. Kukathas's Liberal Archipelago is an interesting read in liberal political theory.

Liberalism, he says, is about freedom of conscience and the freedom to do as one likes so long as one doesn't prevent others from doing as they like. As such, he says, liberal freedom includes the rights of illiberal groups to do as they like and the state should be either minimal or non-existent - never intervening in groups abilities to live as they please.

Of course, this causes difficulties because this liberal view can wind up tolerating an awful lot of illiberalism, and what's worse, some groups may treat members very illiberally.

What then? Frankly, as interesting as this book is and as good as Kukathas's approach to political theory is, I am not sure he gives convincing answers to the question of what to do when illiberal groups act illiberally toward members. Largely, he says it is something we must tolerate to be liberal. But what about groups that won't let members leave without extreme psychological, financial, or other cost? Surely, they are no longer living the life their conscience wants them to live, so why does Kukathas - who values freedom of conscience - treat this as an acceptable trade-off?

Also of concern to me is the question of children who, frankly, it is absurd to say have exit rights. Kukathas, again, concedes that some groups will treat kids very badly - indoctrinating, mutilating, or even killing them direclty or indirectly Why the one trade-off and not the other?

Kukathas's only answer is that there is a slippery slope in invoking the state who, once they intervene in one area, will find it irresistable to intervene in others. That may be so, but if freedom of conscience for individuals is important, then surely kids being mutilated who don't have exit rights because they are too young or weak is a SERIOUS violation of freedom of conscience, so it is odd that Kukathas treats the case so cavelierly, accepting it largely out of a conjectural worry about a slippery slope.

Be this as it may, Kukatha's book certainly deserves to be read. He is a very clear writer, first. Second, his approach to political theory - which starts with an assumption that people do not and probably will not all agree on basic principles of justice or what basic political structures should look like - is a really unique but good one. Instead of starting as most liberals do with the question of what the state should do, he starts with the idea of why there should be a unitary state at all.

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This book seeks an answer to the question: what is the principled basis of a free society marked by cultural diversity and group loyalties? It contends that a free society is an open society whose fundamental principle is the principle of freedom of association. It advances an idea of a liberal archipelago which provides a better metaphor of the free society. Keywords: free society , freedom of association , liberal archipelago. Forgot password? Don't have an account?

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Would you like to tell us about a lower price? If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support? In his major new work Chandran Kukathas offers, for the first time, a book-length treatment of this controversial and influential theory of minority rights. The work is a defence of a form of liberalism and multiculturalism. The general question it tries to answer is: what is the principled basis of a free society marked by cultural diversity and group loyalties? More particularly, it explains whether such a society requires political institutions which recognize minorities; how far it should tolerate such minorities when their ways differ from those of the mainstream community; to what extent political institutions should address injustices suffered by minorities at the hands of the wider society, and also at the hands of the powerful within their own communities; what role, if any, the state should play in the shaping of a society's national identity; and what fundamental values should guide our reflections on these matters. Its main contention is that a free society is an open society whose fundamental principle is the principle of freedom of association.

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